Read/Download - Digital Humanities Discussion Group

Contact: Daniel Johnson, Digital Humanities & English Literature Librarian [email]

Fall 2017 Session 3

Tuesday, Dec. 5, 12:00 pm
All students, faculty, and staff welcome to attend. Coffee and pastries provided. Registration is helpful, but not required.

Reading TBD.

Fall 2017 Session 2 -- DH and Newspaper Research

Tuesday, Oct. 24, 12:00 pm
All students, faculty, and staff welcome to attend. Coffee and pastries provided. Registration is helpful, but not required.

For this session, participants will consider the lessons of text reuse, and specifically poetry republication, across thousands of nineteenth-century news articles.

Article links:
“‘Fugitive Verses’: The Circulation of Poems in Nineteenth-Century American Newspapers”
https://muse-jhu-edu.proxy.library.nd.edu/article/652267

Viral texts project, two interfaces:
http://viraltexts.northeastern.edu
http://viraltexts.org

 

Fall 2017 Session 1

Tuesday, Sep. 19, 12:00 pm
All students, faculty, and staff welcome to attend. Coffee and pastries provided. Registration is helpful, but not required.

For this first session, we will consider what large amounts of text can tell us about language shifts through time. In a very short article, “A Parallax Reading of Roethke’s ‘My Papa’s Waltz,’” Mark Sample uses a corpus of 400 million words to make a close reading argument about a short poem. And for a bonus optional read, we might consider anachronisms in historical tele-fiction with historian Benjamin Schmidt’s “Making Downton more Traditional: https://web.archive.org/web/20161124011024/http://www.prochronism.com/2012/04/making-downton-more-traditional.html.”

No previous experience with digital tools required. Coffee and cookies provided.

Article links:
“A Parallax Reading of Roethke’s ‘My Papa’s Waltz’: On Abuse and Close and Distant Readings”
http://www.samplereality.com/2017/05/31/a-parallax-reading-of-roethkes-my-papas-waltz/

“Making Downton more Traditional”
http://www.prochronism.com/2012/04/making-downton-more-traditional.html

 

ARCHIVE

Spring 2017 Session 3 -- Digital Analysis of Literature through Etymology

Thursday, Apr. 6, 11:00 am NOTE NEW TIME
All students, faculty, and staff welcome to attend. Coffee and pastries provided. Registration is helpful, but not required.

What can the source of vocabulary tell us about a text, and what are the dangers of analyzing text etymologically? The DH discussion group, Read/Download, will talk about Jonathan Reeve's short article, A Macro-Etymological Analysis of Milton’s Paradise Lost, which compares the German and Latinate speech registers of the different books and the different speakers of Milton's Paradise Lost. The article explains the digital methodology in a clear way, and it should be a suggestive discussion for casual readers and seventeenth-century scholars alike. All experience levels and disciplines are warmly invited; no technical background needed. And as always, free cookies and coffee.

Article link: http://jonreeve.com/2016/07/paradise-lost-macroetymology/

Spring 2017 Session 2 -- Key DH methods in a nutshell

Thursday, Mar. 2, 11:00 am NOTE NEW TIME
All students, faculty, and staff welcome to attend. Coffee and pastries provided. Registration is helpful, but not required.

If you want to know how and why computers are being used to analyze literature, this is the session for you! The DH discussion group, Read/Download, will be talking about a very short article by Matt Jockers, “The Ancient World in Nineteenth-Century Fiction,” which boils down, in simple terms, some of the major DH methods, including topic modeling and sentiment analysis. It is a great opportunity to learn about the kinds of arguments one can make with computational evidence. All experience levels and disciplines are warmly invited; no technical background needed. Plus, free cookies and coffee!

Article link: http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/10/2/000250/000250.html

Spring 2017 Session 1 -- Text Reuse and Plagiarism

Thursday, Feb 2, 11:00 am NOTE NEW TIME
All students, faculty, and staff welcome to attend. Coffee and pastries provided. Registration is helpful, but not required.

Read / Download takes up text reuse with two short articles about machine comparison of texts. In our media environment of borrowed words and phrases, what distinguishes new work from stealing, and can computers help us tell the difference? We travel from the controversy surrounding Axolotl Roadkill, a 2010 novel that was withdrawn from prize nomination for copying passages from other novels, to the Speculum Morale, a fourteenth-century encyclopedia that lifted passages from multiple sources wholesale, to Oliver Goldsmith’s unacknowledged direct translations of French philosophies in the eighteenth century. Everyone is welcome, and this is a great opportunity to introduce yourself to digital humanities if you've never had the chance. We'll ease the process by supplying coffee and cookies. 

Readings: The first article is “Deconstructing Bricolage” by a team at Monash U (http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/9/1/000203/000203.html), and the second article is a blog post by Notre Dame graduate student Doug Duhaime (http://douglasduhaime.com/blog/cross-lingual-plagiarism-detection-with-scikit-learn), both freely available online.

[top]

Fall 2016 Session 3 -- What digital methods can tell us what about humanities scholarship: JSTOR DFR and the Enlightenment

Wednesday, November 30, 12:00 pm
All students, faculty, and staff welcome to attend. Coffee and pastries provided. Registration is helpful, but not required.

On November 30 at noon, Read / Download will subject humanities scholarship itself to digital analysis. We will discuss an article by Dan Edelstein, Professor of French Literature at Stanford University, about text-mining JSTOR for the modern history of Enlightenment studies. Then we will try using JSTOR Data for Research ourselves to trace the career of literary figures such as Gore Vidal and Hunter S. Thompson in twentieth-century criticism. No prior DH experience required.

 Reading: “Enlightenment Scholarship by the Numbers: dfr.jstor.org, Dirty Quantification, and the Future of the Lit Review” by Dan Edelstein [http://arcade.stanford.edu/rofl/enlightenment-scholarship-numbers-dfrjstororg-dirty-quantification-and-future-lit-review]

 

[top]

Fall 2016 Session 2

Wednesday, October 26, 12:00 pm
All students, faculty, and staff welcome to attend. Coffee and pastries provided. Registration is helpful, but not required.

This month, Read / Download considers the sliding scale of differences between plagiarism and bricolage as we read two short articles about machine comparison of “similar” texts. Does reconstituting someone else’s words and syntax in a new context create a new work? Or is it base stealing? The new brings us to the old again, as we travel from the controversy surrounding  Axolotl Roadkill, a 2010 novel that was withdrawn from prize nomination for copying passages from other novels, to the Speculum Morale, a fourteenth-century encyclopedia that lifted passages from multiple sources wholesale, to Oliver Goldsmith’s unacknowledged direct translations of French philosophes in the eighteenth century. As always, we’ll supply coffee and cookies.

 

Readings: The first article is “Deconstructing Bricolage” by a team at Monash U (http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/9/1/000203/000203.html), and the second article is a blog post by Notre Dame alumnus Doug Duhaime (http://douglasduhaime.com/blog/cross-lingual-plagiarism-detection-with-scikit-learn), both freely available online.

[top]

Fall 2016 Session 1

Wednesday, September 28, 12:00 pm
All students, faculty, and staff welcome to attend. Coffee and pastries provided. Registration is helpful, but not required.

Read / Download is a lively discussion group about humanities topics in a digital media environment. Participants from all disciplines are warmly invited, and no technical expertise is presumed. Typical sessions involve collegial conversation about a bite-sized article or two and, on occasion, workshop demonstrations of digital humanities tools that illustrate concepts invoked in the reading. Bring a brownbag lunch if you like, and we’ll supply coffee and cookies.

 

The first article is historian Amy Hungerford’s provocative piece in the, “On Not Reading” (http://www.chronicle.com/article/On-Refusing-to-Read/237717). David Foster Wallace fans may want to take particular note.

[top]

Spring 2016 Session 3: May 3

Tuesday, May 3, 12:00 pm
All students, faculty, and staff welcome to attend. Coffee and pastries provided. Registration is helpful, but not required.

Join the DH reading group and workshop series Tuesday, May 3, for our last session of the semester as we consider JSTOR Data for Research (DfR) and topic modeling. JSTOR has made strides to support the “big data” drive of digital humanities with their Data for Research Service, but what can one really do with it? A group of literature scholars including Andrew Goldstone and Ted Underwood used topic modeling to analyze the history of literary scholarship through JSTOR DfR, raising fascinating questions along the way. What is topic modeling? Can it really tell us anything significant about the history of scholarship? And how might we use JSTOR DfR ourselves? Come discuss!

 

All are invited: no advanced computing experience is required.

Readings:

Bite-size blog post: “What can topic models of PMLA teach us about the history of literary scholarship?” [LINK HERE]. If you read nothing else, give this a glimpse.

Optional: A slightly longer article from New Literary History for those so inclined: “The Quiet Transformations of Literary Studies: What Thirteen Thousand Scholars Could Tell Us” [LINK HERE].

 

And for a more recent use of DfR in 18th-century studies, check out “Enlightenment Scholarship by the Numbers: dfr.jstor.org, Dirty Quantification, and the Future of the Lit Review” by Dan Edelstein [LINK HERE]

[top]

Spring 2016 Session 2: April 12

Tuesday, Apr. 12, 12:00 pm
All students, faculty, and staff welcome to attend. Coffee and pastries provided. Registration is helpful, but not required.

Join the DH reading group and workshop series Tuesday, April 12, as we consider the field of “sentiment analysis.” Can computers detect emotional valence in language? If so, how might these algorithmic techniques be used? We will discuss Matt Jockers’s (Nebraska) attempt to model plots of novels with sentiment analysis and practice using sentiment analysis ourselves. All are invited: no advanced computing experience is required.

Readings: Start with a brief blog post on Jockers’s application of sentiment analysis to plot detection: <http://www.matthewjockers.net/2015/02/02/syuzhet/>. If you have time, check out Jockers’s recent comparison of this kind of computational  analysis to human-coded versions here: <http://www.matthewjockers.net/2015/12/20/that- sentimental-feeling/>.  And for a taste of how algorithmic criticism can impose false assumptions on a text, see here: <http://www.matthewjockers.net/2015/04/06/epilogue/>.

[top]

Spring 2016 Pairing 1: February 24 (Reading Group), and/or March 3 (Workshop)

Thursday, Mar. 3, 12:00 pm
All students, faculty, and staff welcome to attend. Coffee and pastries provided. Registration is helpful, but not required.

Last week we discussed how DH work implies certain theories about text and we examined the critique that computers only enable surface analysis of literature. Join us this Thursday as we both dive deeper into discussion and get some hands-on experience with digital humanities software. We will advance the debate by re-creating an algorithmic response to Stanley Fish’s New York Times critique of the digital humanities. A very short blog post on the Fish dust-up and the algorithmic response are available here: http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?p=3730

All are invited: no advanced computing experience is required, and we will refresh last week’s discussion on Thomas Rommel’s article, “Literary Studies” [link here], to bring everyone up to speed. Coffee and desserts on us.

Main Workshop Text: "The 'dance of the p's and b's': truth or noise?" by Mark Liberman [open access link]

Last Week's Reading Group Text: "8. Literary Studies," by Thomas Rommel [open access link]

Workshop Tools: Introductory textual and data-wrangling tools

Optional Texts for Reference: “What Is Digital Humanities and What’s It Doing in English Departments?” by Matthew Kirschenbaum [open access link] and “The Matter of Scale” by Julia Flanders and Matthew Jockers [open access link]


[top]